This Annex shows the form of weight lists that should accompany shipments of Bars to Vaults. The form of listing used for Bars which are being submitted as part of an application for GD accreditation differs from that used for commercial shipments as shown below.

Weight lists accompanying Bars (whether for commercial shipments or for Bars submitted by applicants) must be provided in a machine-readable electronic form, such as an Excel or .csv file.

It is important that weight lists show the correct number of decimal places for the weights and assays.

1. Commercial Weight Lists

Gold

Serial number Brand code Gross weight (troy ounces) Assay Fine weight (troy ounces)
123456 XYZ 401.125 995.8 399.440

Silver

Serial number Brand code Gross weight (troy ounces) Assay
234567 XYZ 1164.9 999.0

Notes applying to both gold and silver:

  • In cases where the Refiner weighs in kilograms, the weight list must show how the troy ounce equivalents are calculated using the method of conversion to gross and fine troy ounces shown overleaf. This uses the standard LBMA conversion factor of: 1 troy ounce = 0.0311034768 kg.
  • In the case of commercial shipments of silver Bars, the fineness marked on the Bar and shown on the weight list should be in the same format (for example, whether 999.0,999 or 999.9).

If the weight is measured in troy ounces, it is not necessary to show the kilogram equivalent. The spreadsheet for making these conversions can be found in the GD Section of the LBMA website.

2. Vault Weights versus Refiner Weights

The algorithms shown on the following pages show how to convert metric to troy ounce weights and also how a troy ounce dead-weight should be converted to a final London weight. However, in cases where the Refiner’s weight differs from that determined by the Vault, the latter will be used for recording the troy ounce weight of the Bar.

Annex C (continued) – Sample Weight Lists and Conversions to Troy Ounces

The following tables show how to calculate the gross troy ounce (GTO) weight based on a metric weight and in the case of gold, also the rounded fine troy ounce (FTO).

The table below also shows how to convert an electronic troy ounce deadweight (e.g. in column (3)) to London GTO and FTO weights.

Gold